Friday, January 29, 2016

Rene Magritte and Linear Perspective: 6th grade



I've been living with a shortened art schedule for 5.5 years, now.  Art used to be one hour and AMAZING.  Then cuts came, unfortunately, and now Art is once a week for 40 minutes (when there are no delays or interruptions).  Linear perspective is important to learn, and it's just as important to start kids on it before junior high, so I've been experimenting with different ways to do it that fit the schedule but are still worthwhile and have decent results.  It always seems to take forever.  This year I had one sixth grade class that was really behind (field trip, community circle, absent art teacher....the list goes on) but they still needed to learn linear perspective.  Instead of learning how to draw a town (which takes about 5 classes to complete), I used Rene Magritte's The Listening Room as inspiration and instead taught watered down linear perspective.



It WORKED!  Results were decent, the concept was taught, and I threw in a little contrast and value along the way.

Magritte was a Belgian Surrealist painter, meaning he painted dreamscapes/non-existent worlds.  He tended to combine ordinary objects in unusual ways that many think are just plain weird.  In my opinion,  Magritte was a class act as far as Surrealists go.  Anyway, on with the Art!

We started out using basic one point perspective to create the room, and sketched an organic, oversized object in the center.  To emphasize organic vs. geometric, we used colored pencil for the background and chalk for our object ('cause who doesn't love chalk?).  For their window with a view, it was the sky's the limit-anything goes as long as it's school appropriate.

I personally love the pile of shoe laces coming through the window (and was PC Artist of the Week).

 XXL Double Cheeseburger (also PC Artist of the Week)








 I usually hate spiders, but I'll make an exception for this one.



It just might be a keeper.  Just have to work on our window a little more next year.


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